Books I read in 2012

Felt like I watched too much tv this year…. But looking back, I actually got a fair amount of reading in as well.

What I read in 2012…..

Steve Jobs, by Walter Issacson

 Peak, by Chip Conley

        

  What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast, by Laura Vanderkam

 

Feeling is the Secret, by Neville Goodard

The Girl with the Dragon Tatoo, by Stieg Larsson

A Million Miles in a Thousand Years, by Donald Miller

 The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, by Patrick Lencioni

The Five Temptations of a CEO, by Patrick Lencioni

        

 The Amatuer, by Edward Klein

        

 Venture Deals, by Brad Feld

And What’s on my list for 2013…….

        

Raising Cain, by Dan Kindlon

       

Enjoy Every Sandwich, by Lee Lipsenthal

         

Think Like a Futurist, by Cecily Sommers

          

Autobiography of a Yogi, by Paramahansa Yogananda

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, by Robert Pirsig (Again – read in the 90s)

Quiet – The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking, by Susan Cain

        

168 Hours, by Laura Venderkam

        

Who’s the Fairest of Them ALL?, by Steven Moore

        

The Advantage, by Patrick Lencioni

For 2013, maybe a little less American Idol and more time for reading, or not....

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Wanna Know More About Tim Ferris? Watch This

Kevin Rose interviews Tim Ferris – talking about everything from 4Hour Workweek to 4Hour Body and even his new book 4Hour Chef.

To me, Tim is a fascinating and for sure crazy guy with a lot of great answers and tricks for life.

Some of his stuff….

He picked the title of his first book 4Hour Workweek by doing analytics on google ad words

He went in to Borders Book stores and taped different versions of his cover to other author’s books to see how many people would pick up the different versions in an hour.

For more interviews like this check out Kevin Rose’s The Foundation 

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The Resistance

Maybe the best “first page” of a book I’ve read in a long time.  Following on the current them after reading and listening to Seth Godin‘s Lynchpins for the past couple of months, I landed on “the War of Art” by Steven Pressfield.

Page One -What I Do

I get up, take a shower, have breakfast. I read the paper, brush my teeth. If I have phone calls to make, I make them. I’ve got my coffee now. I put on my lucky work boots and stitch up the lucky laces that my niece Meredith gave me. I head back to my office, crank up the computer. My lucky hooded sweatshirt is draped over the chair, with the lucky charm I got from a gypsy in Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer for only eight bucks in francs, and my lucky LARGO name tag that came from a dream I once had. On my thesaurus is my lucky cannon that my friend Bob Versandi gave me from Morro Castle, Cuba. I point it toward my chair, so it can fire inspiration into me. I say my prayer, which is the Invocation of the Muse from Homer’s Odyssey, translation by T.E. Lawrence, Lawrence of Arabia, which my dear mate Paul Rink gave me and which sits near my shelf with the cuff links that belonged to my father and my lucky acorn from the battlefield at Thermopylae. It’s about ten-thirty now. I sit down and plunge in. When I start making typos, I know I’m getting tired. That’s four hours or so. I’ve hit the point of diminishing returns. I wrap for the day. Copy whatever I’ve done to disk and stash the disk in the glove compartment of my truck in case there’s a fire and I have to run for it. I power down. It’s three-thirty. The office is closed. How many pages have I produced? I don’t care. Are they any good? I don’t even think about it. All that matter is I’ve put in my time and hit it with all I’ve got. All that counts is that, for this day, for this session, I have overcome resistance.

Page Two – What I Know

There’s a secret that real writers know that wannabe writers don’t, and the secret is this: It’s not the writing part that’s hard. What’s hard is sitting down to write.

What keeps us from sitting down is the Resistance.

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Real Artists Ship

After some back and forth emails with a real artist, Jessie from Stray Dog Arts, she sent me a link to a podcast interview with Seth Godin talking about his new book Lynchpins on the Accidental Creatives Blog.

It is a great listen and pushes all the right buttons.

I read Lynchpins a few months back and it has been kind of top of mind this summer in my daily journeys.  Its about becoming remarkable, indispensable and doing things that matter.  Acknowledging and accepting the resistance as part of being creative and inspirational and GETTING THROUGH IT.

From the interview….The days are over where we can expect Ford to open up a factory next door and pay us $120k to build cars.  It’s OVER.  What is replacing that is organizations big and small made up with unique individuals that are doing things that matter and most importantly without a manual.  To do things that matter and to do them without a manual you have to get over the resistance and you have to learn to ship…..This economy is punishing the fearful and and increasingly benefitting those that are brave enough to be creative and generous enough to give it away.  But to give it away you have to ship.

The single biggest part of Lynchpins that I think about is the Chapter on Shipping “Real Artist Ship”.  Who said that?  Steve Jobs (even when the antenna doesn’t work I guess). For me, there are thousands of things to get in the way of shipping – it can always be a little bit better if I just spend a few more hours on it – but value isn’t happening when something is still in my laptop or in my head.  If it is going to matter, I have to ship it.

And to ship it – I have to confront the resistance.

Am I shipping today or am I giving in to the resistance.  For me its not a philosophical question it is a daily challenge.  Next

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